Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Fire Pit

One of my favorite things to do in the fall is to sit around the fire with some friends. That being said, this was the first thing I wanted to tackle at my new house. I'm a little late posting about it, but it was really simple.

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Somehow, I lost all of the pictures I had of the process. So basically here it is in diagrams, with a finished product.

1. I measured out a 42" circle in my yard and dug out the grass. Why 42"? Well 40" just wasn't wide enough and 45" was just too wide. Believe me, this was the longest part of the process, deciding the width. Of course, your width will depend on the pavers you buy. I got lucky when I did this backwards, but I'd recommend buying payers THEN measuring and digging. 


2. Then I went to Home Depot and bought some paver bricks. The guy at Home Depot insisted that I needed to buy something to secure the bricks together, but I assured him that I would not be needing anything like that. They may have been a bit annoyed with me, but I laid out a circle right there in their garden department to make sure I bought the right amount and it was the size I wanted. Don't forget to take a tape measure so that you don't have to lay it all out again when you get home.

3. Using the level app on my iPhone (yeah, I probably should have used a real level, but hey that would have required going inside and down to the basement and my phone was in my pocket), I laid the first layer of bricks and made sure it was level. Scraping a little dirt away here and adding a little bit there until I was satisfied with everything.

I had two shapes, a trapezoid and a rectangle. The rectangle pieces helped to complete the circle between the trapezoid pieces. Like this: 

12 of each piece made a layer. Total, I had 36 of each shape.

4. I added the last two layers and viola! It was finished. 

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Note: This is simply how I built my fire pit. I am no expert in materials safe for use by fire, this was simply the set-up at Home Depot minus the insert. I've heard from a couple readers that they believe you MUST have an insert. I've done some research on this and there are mixed reviews out there. I have put mine through two summers of heavy (at least twice a week) use and have had no issues, but I will leave the option of an insert up to you! 

20 comments:

  1. Love this design! Pinned it so that I can make one too!

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  2. What a great post...I pinned it so I can find it again since we are thinking about putting a fire pit in our backyard! Your blog is awesome. You've run some GREAT series! I'm following on GFC so I can keep up with all your amazing"ness". What is going to be your next series? I'm super pumped!

    I'd love for you to stop by and visit sometime. Have a wonderful day!

    Marilyn
    4you-withlove.blogspot.com

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  3. This is an amazing design! I love how it turned out. I wish we could have a fire pit at our house! You did an awesome job. Thank you so much for linking up at Artsy Corner! I can't wait to see what you have in store for us next week!

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  4. Such a great idea! Can't wait to have a house of my own so I can do this! Thanks for the tutorial and the tips! Keep up the amazing work, friend! :)
    Thanks for sharing at Artsy Corner!

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  5. What is the trapezoid brick called? I tried looking it up at the website to price it and they don't have any

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    1. Here they are: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Pavestone-10-25-in-x-7-in-Cafe-RumbleStone-Trap-Wall-Block-92369/203158385#.UiD-W5KKLsc

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  6. I'm curious how far down you dug your hole, and if anything was placed in or over it prior to laying the bricks down?

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    1. All I did was scrape the grass away. It's settled a bit since I put it in place, but I just put it directly in the dirt. I have fires often enough that weeds don't grow up in it or anything, but I'm sure you could put some gravel in the bottom if you'd like.

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  7. Great! Thanks for the tutorial! I've always wanted to build a fire pit, but have been afraid to try! Your post makes it look easy!

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  8. Showed this to my husband....told him I was going to make this to replace the existing fire pit in the yard. He said i MUST have an insert in the center or the pavers would break down. How long has yours lasted? Im just going to do it anyways when hes at work one day ;) Its how all my projects get done!

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    1. I've had mine for two years now, lots of fires and it's doing great. Still strong, no bricks breaking down. That's a good point, though and I hadn't thought of that, but so far no problems!

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    2. You just made my day, literally!! I livebin Phoenix, AZ and thought of the idea oh I say 15 mins. Ago, dreading the same research I did anyway... And I went to DYI clicked on youe pic and as luck has I have the same two types of bricks you used just laying around in my shed! Luck & convenience has never been something that just drops in my lap... so I TY you very much and just have 2 ?'s.... How long did it take and how deep did you dig the hole? Thanks again & have a pleasant day & there after, Kandice!

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  9. I love this outdoor fire pit
    . It is really creative and looked like it took some real time and effort. They can be amazing on cold winter nights.

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  10. Home Depot in Louisville, KY just had a Ladies Night where they instructed how to make that exact firepit, using the same pavers you did - same size too. They said the insert is optional. We have heavy clay here so they instructed to dig deeper and put down gravel and such for better draining - they also advised using an adhesive between rings and did it 4 rings tall.

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  11. How much would you say you paId for all the material? This fire pit is BEAUTIFUL!

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  12. Just did this exact pit with these exact stones from Home Depot. Tip: Order them online for pickup. $110. They had them waiting at the service desk. I loaded them up, and it literally took no more than 30 minutes to build it. Now to find a guy that sells firewood in the summer bc I'm fresh out.

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  13. 42" inches outside or inside diameter of the pavers? Love this idea think i will do it this week while the wife is out of town and surprise her.

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  14. Having an insert in-between the paver slabs is a good idea. The stones tend to expand when heated, and that insert will keep the pavers from getting worn out easily. It’s good that you looked up that issue before installing the fire pit. At the very least, you don’t have to worry about it in the near future. Cheers!

    Lindsey Mckenzie @ Buchanan Fire and Outdoor

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  15. Nice! I liked yours so much I went out and followed your lead. I went 4 rows high and added another small block for a 1 large block 2 small paver block ratio as I wanted a little larger pit. I love it and so does the whole family. The small paver blocks can be pulled out near the bottom to allow for increased air flow for that perfect fire. Total time for purchase and install was 2 1/2 hours.

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  16. Your blog explaining all the main points very awesomely. Thanks for sharing this knowledgeable post.
    Fire Table

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